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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am new to fly fishing and was told to start off with some orrignal Wolly Buggers and some beadheads, but I have noticed there are different sizes classified in a number system what sizes would be best for trout/bass?
 

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I am new to fly fishing and was told to start off with some orrignal Wolly Buggers and some beadheads, but I have noticed there are different sizes classified in a number system what sizes would be best for trout/bass?
Dry fly
I usually go with size 12/14 for dry fly (trout)

Wet, nymph, streamer etc...
it depends how deep the water is usually.. deeper it is -- usually you will use bigger fly size. This time of year I will change my fly from size 8 to 10... again, all depends where you fish and how the water level...
 

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Size depends on the time of year, species and a lot of other factors. When the sea run brookies are starting up the rivers in the spring they like a larger bushier fly from size 6 up to 2 in the patterns you mention along with muddlers and streamers. Those same trout holding in a stream in the summer will take much smaller flies right down to 26's if you've got young enough eyes to tie one on. Usually size 12 to 16 produce best for me on the really small streams I fish.

For bass you want to use the larger flies from 4 up to 2/0. Bass will go for just about anything, but I've had best luck with brighter colours like yellow, orange, chartruse and red.

If you're just learning to cast you might want to practice with some smaller flies than buggers and bead heads. A #6 salmon bug is a great size to practice with.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I have got down casting so far, I just haven't been on the river too much because I don't have quality flies and at the moment I have zero flies.
 

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Bead headed olive wooly bugger is an awesome fly but is harder to cast. Stick with dry flies like mosquitoe, grey wolf or other canadian tire specials, there good to beat around for a bit. I tend to buy flies around home to support local guys.
 

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#8 original bugger is the standard/most popular size,available everywhere,easy to cast,and deadly on trout.Beadheads can be a bit trickier to cast for a rookie but nothing to be intimidated over,however you're more likely to hook yourself,or even worse,break your rod tip with a 90mph beadhead.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
#8 original bugger is the standard/most popular size,available everywhere,easy to cast,and deadly on trout.Beadheads can be a bit trickier to cast for a rookie but nothing to be intimidated over,however you're more likely to hook yourself,or even worse,break your rod tip with a 90mph beadhead.
what makes these flies hard to cast? and why is the beadhead so difficult?
 

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what makes these flies hard to cast? and why is the beadhead so difficult?
Flies weighted with lead wraps,beads,cones,etc. simply require a slightly modified casting trchnique.You generally need to slow down your fore and back casts and open up your loops to prevent leader fouling,hooking yourself,smashing rod tip,etc.
 
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