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I,ve been reading all kinds of reports,that the striped bass population in Mirimachi is incredible.Has anyone been fishing for them in that area?i know that you can't keep any on the eastern part of N.B, but would love to go try a little catch and release.I do hope that come next season,they allow some sort of open season for stripers.If they are being caught there i would like to know of a good place to cast a line?Thank You.
 

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they caught some all the way up in quarryville so probly anywhere in that river could be good.... but in the miramichi u cant fish with treble hooks only single hooks and it has to be barbless.... also if your fishing with lures u have to be lower than doyle brook on main southwest and lower than red bank bridge if your going toward red bank... be sure u know the laws down there cuz theres alot of ways to get caught there
 

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hmmm. stripers in the miramichi are just barley starting to recover from near extinction. the idea that these small numbers of stripers are now causing problems with salmon, on just one brach of the river, is rediculous, and opening a keeper season for that reason is criminal! Are the trout next? why have conservation if this is the attitude. by this same reasoning the salmon should be targeted to protect the much more endangered striper. we probabley only have stripers on the east coast of N.B. because of stocking in the st. lawrence river.

now, if the numbers show it's sustainable, a catch and release season on fly sounds like a real challenge, as would a lure season in the river mouth/harbour area, and all along that coast. i landed a few 2 years ago off beldune surf fishing for mackeral.

how about a keep and kill only season for small mouth bass in the miramichi?! that would make a lot more sense. instead these illegaly stocked fish are completely protected - i can see no sound reason for this.
 

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Stripers in the NW Miramichi abound from the Strawberry Marsh, all the way to almost Red Bank(22km). In late May, this year, they were on the shallow side of the river from Eel Ground to Red Bank(15km). All of this as they are getting ready to spawn. It's hard to determine how many are in the river, but on a sunny day, you can always see some swimming by under the boat. There must be tens of thousands(or more). They will hit anything, soft tubes, worms, Mr twisters etc... lures(red devils, five of diamonds etc), bass spinnerbaits. Pretty much anything that you can fling from a rod, they will hit. Most that take are in the 2-3lb range, but some easily go to 15lbs. Hopefully, the biologist will soon determine that are enough in the river to re-open a season of some kind. I would say that these bass must be getting a significant amount of smolt and small trout. It sure is hard to catch a trout with all these bass hanging around.
 

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...... There must be tens of thousands(or more). They will hit anything, soft tubes, worms, Mr twisters etc... lures(red devils, five of diamonds etc), bass spinnerbaits. Pretty much anything that you can fling from a rod, they will hit. .... I would say that these bass must be getting a significant amount of smolt and small trout.
ABSOLUTELY!They will eat anything they can fit into their big mouths and then some.Stripers invading from the sea,smallmouth from the headwaters,and a gauntlet of gillnets in between....just another nail in the salmon's coffin imho.Two words....open season!
 

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ABSOLUTELY!They will eat anything they can fit into their big mouths and then some.Stripers invading from the sea,smallmouth from the headwaters,and a gauntlet of gillnets in between....just another nail in the salmon's coffin imho.Two words....open season!
One difference is that stripers are not an invasive species. However they do seem to be recovering better than salmon.
 

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BobD you nailed it on the head, these are not an invasive species. i hope the numbers do allow for fishing. and of course they eat salmon and trout. they eat suckers and love eels to. but they are not the cause of the problem, or there wouldn't have been salmon there for the last thousand years. you can't say that about small mouths.
 

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BobD you nailed it on the head, these are not an invasive species. i hope the numbers do allow for fishing. and of course they eat salmon and trout. they eat suckers and love eels to. but they are not the cause of the problem, or there wouldn't have been salmon there for the last thousand years. you can't say that about small mouths.
I'm with you 100%, Stripers deserve the same respect that salmon, trout and all other species of NATIVE fish receive. Just because there are a number of elite anglers out there that want nothing but salmon in the rivers, all native species deserve the same right to live and multiply to create a diverse fishing experience for all anglers to enjoy. God knows we all pay enough for the right to fish! As far as the Smallie and Musky is concerned, they too deserve a place in the scheme of things. I see a huge potential for a Musky fishery, they are already charging up to $600.00 a day for a chance at boating one, I wonder home much the salmon guides are getting paid?
New Brunswick has been the ass-end of the sport fishery for years , I think it's nice to see some species starting to make a come back, If the Government would get a little more involved and put some decent funds back into the sport we could eventually have a first class fishery, not only for salmon, but also Musky,Stripers,Smallies, Trout and even Sturgeon, which would not only attract more younger people back into the sport but also bring in more tourists and make them stay a little longer in the province rather than using N.B. as a through way to another fishing destination in another province.
 

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Very well said gmac!All anglers are a family, though there tends to be an awful lot of focus on the Trout and Salmon.Your 100% right with your view on the Stripers,if they were to mess things up, it would have happened years ago.I too feel we should be more concerned with the Stripers, and I have nothing against the add on species such as Musky.Do some research and see what the sport fishery in the states brings in for $$$$$ from Stripers.
 

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One more point I would like to make. Yes, stripers are native fish. That being said, if the efforts to improve the numbers of stripers has worked better than improving salmon, then there could easily be a disproportionate amount of stripers compared to salmon in the river. Where salon are struggling, and additional stress on them is hard for their numbers. Nature is out of balance in our rivers. Above I distinguished between native and invasive species, but I did not mean to imply that stripers were not a problem for salmon. Everything that kills any salmon is currently a problem for them. No easy solution here, as you don't want to discourage the striper comeback, but it comes with a cost.
 

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One more point I would like to make. Yes, stripers are native fish. That being said, if the efforts to improve the numbers of stripers has worked better than improving salmon, then there could easily be a disproportionate amount of stripers compared to salmon in the river. Where salon are struggling, and additional stress on them is hard for their numbers. Nature is out of balance in our rivers. Above I distinguished between native and invasive species, but I did not mean to imply that stripers were not a problem for salmon. Everything that kills any salmon is currently a problem for them. No easy solution here, as you don't want to discourage the striper comeback, but it comes with a cost.
I strongly feel that if we let nature take it's course,things will eventually work themselves out. Back in the days when we had a commercial fishery for the striped bass, we didn't have a problem with salmon numbers. The rivers were full of them with very little impact from the striper.We may lose some traditional waters that have carried salmon stocks in a few areas ,but were these areas a stronghold for salmon before the big striper crash or did the salmon fill a void after the stripers were gone?
I agree that any predation on salmon stocks is a critical blow to their recovery and one area that the government needs to address is the staggering
numbers of cormorants in our river systems.If you fish around the Falls and up river as much as I do, then you know what I'm talking about.There are thousands of these birds, the islands around the falls are covered with them so densely you can't see the rocks for birds.These birds eat 25% of their own body weight every day(that's roughly 1 lb.per day),so from mid April till early Sept., each bird will consume 143 lbs of salmon par, trout,herring or anything else they can catch. Multiply that by thousands and you have a problem. The Saint John River system is over a hundred miles long, but everything trying to make it to the sea has to pass through the narrow gorge at the falls. There is water there over 100 feet deep but there are also ledges that are only 20 or 30 feet down. Cormorants can dive to 90-100 feet, so the fish stocks don't have a chance!These predators don't have many natural enemies as they breed and spend most of their lives on the desolate islands in and around our shorelines. Something needs to be done to thin their numbers out if our fish stocks are going to have any chance for a recovery any time soon.
 

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The stripers are recovering in the Miramichi because there is no season that you can fish them. The reason for this is because they were near extinction. Maybe the DFO should put a ban on salmon fishing for a few years and also stop the factory trawlers and the salmon stocks would return. All of thses species used to be fine till man started harvesting anything and everything they can get in a net. It isn't only the Miramichi that is having problems with Atlantic Salmon stocks dropping, the europeans are having the same problem. Maybe they have large numbers of cormorants and stripers over there eating all the fry.
 

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there certainly is a cormerant problem, they are having problems with them in Ontario too but for a different reason - the destruction of trees along the water from their crap.
with almost no preditors any more to control their numbers, they are just eating machines. there used to be problems with mergansers too but there numbers seem to be, well, appropriate? at a guess anyway.

the comerants are tricky to deal with. the province tried to control the season at one time only to get slapped because the feds consider them a migratory species, whitch would put them under the north american treaty status. still, that wasn't a big part of the problem - we just don't shot things we don't eat anymore. coyotes are my only personal exception. it's just not politicaly correct any more, and of course with good reason. however, when we need some people to go by the license and go blast some scags (my fathers name for them), well, we just don't seem to have a lot of volunteers. it could be the big bucks for the ammo, or we just don't see it as a pressing matter. i don't see an easy or politicaly correct solution - maybe the pil for cormarants? lol, it might work.
 

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there certainly is a cormerant problem, they are having problems with them in Ontario too but for a different reason - the destruction of trees along the water from their crap.
with almost no preditors any more to control their numbers, they are just eating machines. there used to be problems with mergansers too but there numbers seem to be, well, appropriate? at a guess anyway.

the comerants are tricky to deal with. the province tried to control the season at one time only to get slapped because the feds consider them a migratory species, whitch would put them under the north american treaty status. still, that wasn't a big part of the problem - we just don't shot things we don't eat anymore. coyotes are my only personal exception. it's just not politicaly correct any more, and of course with good reason. however, when we need some people to go by the license and go blast some scags (my fathers name for them), well, we just don't seem to have a lot of volunteers. it could be the big bucks for the ammo, or we just don't see it as a pressing matter. i don't see an easy or politicaly correct solution - maybe the pil for cormarants? lol, it might work.
I think the rules for the cormorants are a litle to much. They should open it so people can shoot shore. I got a few out on my boat but its not everybody that has boat to hunt them out off. Still their fun to hunt.
 

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ive heard that striped bass fishing was open in miramichi....is there anyone that can comfirm that? or is it just a rumour?
 

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there certainly is a cormerant problem, they are having problems with them in Ontario too but for a different reason - the destruction of trees along the water from their crap.
with almost no preditors any more to control their numbers, they are just eating machines. there used to be problems with mergansers too but there numbers seem to be, well, appropriate? at a guess anyway.

the comerants are tricky to deal with. the province tried to control the season at one time only to get slapped because the feds consider them a migratory species, whitch would put them under the north american treaty status. still, that wasn't a big part of the problem - we just don't shot things we don't eat anymore. coyotes are my only personal exception. it's just not politicaly correct any more, and of course with good reason. however, when we need some people to go by the license and go blast some scags (my fathers name for them), well, we just don't seem to have a lot of volunteers. it could be the big bucks for the ammo, or we just don't see it as a pressing matter. i don't see an easy or politicaly correct solution - maybe the pil for cormarants? lol, it might work.
It is a tricky problem dealing with two levels of government, but it was done successfully in the Great Lakes Region . But just to give you an example of how quickly these things can multiply,in the early 50's, there were approx. 900 pairs of nesting cormorants in the Great Lakes, due to so much chemical pollution in the lakes the numbers dropped to 125 breeding pairs in 1973.Once the water cleared up, those 125 pairs of birds exploded to 138,000 breeding pairs from 1973-1993. Culling the nests did little to bring down the numbers because these birds are like coyotes, the more they are pressured, the bigger the birth rate. They usually lay 3-4 eggs with a 28 day incubation period, so when the nests were culled, they would just lay more eggs!What DID WORK was the spraying of eggs with a mixture of formaldyhyde and soap! This mixture covered the eggs and cut off any oxygen from getting to the forming embroyo, causing it to suffocate. The eggs were still intact so the birds didn't know the difference and kept trying to incubate the affected eggs till the breeding period ended. By then it was to late to lay more! That simple act wiped out a whole breeding year for thousands of cormorants, thus taking out thousands more new birds! According to the latest opinions from scientists, these birds if left unchecked could double every 3 years, so something has to be done from both levels of government if we are to have a sustainable fishery weather it be Salmon, Trout, Bass or whatever species you target. They ARE fun to shoot,I used to get a special game licence and hunt them down around the Milledgeville shore line up to Ragged Point all summer long. Come duck season, I was ready! I think it would be a ball to hunt them out around the islands in the the bay and around Partridge Island .As far as I know,they are still on the Special Game Permit and I don't think there is any limit on them although I haven't hunted them since they put all the new housing and roadwork in down around Milledgville.
 

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fyi
special game permit = varmit license, and i just checked, cormarant is still on it.
 

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rej-no striper fishing in miramichi, still concidered an endangered species there, they are just starting to come back after massize overfishing and ridiculus by-catch rules
 
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