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In a couple of other threads there is lots of discussion about sea trout runs and their timing, sea trout populations and the wisdom of catch and release, etc. I am wondering why pepople choose to label "trout A" as a sea trout and "trout B" as a brook trout.

When you catch a nice trout, why do you think it is a "sea trout" as opposed to a resident trout that lives in that particular river all its life? What do you actually know (as opposed to what have you been told by other fishermen, relatives, etc) that distinguishes a sea trout from a regular brook trout (a species of char)? (I know there are potentially other species of trout that may run in and out of salt water, but most people in our province will be talking about sea-run brook trout.)

Do you have scientific and biological evidence to decide that a fish is native to a river or not? Please cite the source of your information for determining the differences between the fish.
 

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i consider a sea trout to be a trout that runs down river to the estuary where they feed heavily and run back up river! ohh n they are great fun to catch on a 7 foot 5wt
 

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Brook trout =


Sea trout =

See the difference now?


Same river, both brook trout. One heads out to sea or at least winters at the mouth of it then comes back in the spring to spawn, the other stays in fresh water. The sea-bound one loses its vibrant brookie colors.
 

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i was always told that even when the sea run moves in and gets its bright colors back a way you can tell if its is a local trout is the roof on its mouth . if its black its a local trout and if its white or light colored its not a local trout or a trout that has moved in from a run . im not sure how much truth there is to this but just what i have been told over the years.
 

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A brook trout is a sea trout. They are all brookies. The silver ones that are pointed out here are just trout that moved down into the deeper waters in tidal areas after spawning last fall and beef up. They turn silver again just like an Atlantic salmon. Then head back up river in May and June to start the whole cycle all over again.

Studies were done where transmitters were put in large trout in the Kenebecasis way down river and the trout migrated into areas around Portage Vale to spawn. They spent the entire summer in deep dark holes. Then after spawning returned down past Norton and spent the rest of the time in large deeper water only to return the following spring to the spawning grounds. These large trout did not go out to sea like an Atlantic Salmon.
 

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A brook trout is a sea trout. They are all brookies. The silver ones that are pointed out here are just trout that moved down into the deeper waters in tidal areas after spawning last fall and beef up. They turn silver again just like an Atlantic salmon. Then head back up river in May and June to start the whole cycle all over again.

Studies were done where transmitters were put in large trout in the Kenebecasis way down river and the trout migrated into areas around Portage Vale to spawn. They spent the entire summer in deep dark holes. Then after spawning returned down past Norton and spent the rest of the time in large deeper water only to return the following spring to the spawning grounds. These large trout did not go out to sea like an Atlantic Salmon.
I agree with this statement ! As far as the "run" I strongly believe it is based on water temp. I was taught that when the wild strawberries start to flower the so called run of sea trout will be starting. I myself has used this year after year and it works out for me. I'm no biologist but it makes sense cause plants need certain temps to start blooming so if it is a cool spring things are later if it a warm spring things are early. Another good thing to look for is fiddle heads and when they start to break the brown skin. Just a little something to look out for and head to your favorite spot. Good luck and a little suggestion start a log book recording dates and temps and what you see hatching and growing this will help in the years to come.
 

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Brook trout spawn in the fall..not the spring. Yep they are different as the brackish water lends a silver sheen to them, making the traditional spots and colors seem faded. After a month or so in strictly fresh water, the colors return and the silver color fades. The abundance of food means they grow faster and larger, even taste different. I have been looking into sea run brookies for years and am puzzled as to why they "run" around here in the spring. Tradionally, sea run speckles run in the late summer to early fall to spawn. I am of the opinion they do not venture all the way to the ocean. I believe that here in the bay of fundy , because of the extremely high tides, the salt water reaches a long way up rivers and therefore into the mouths of other rivers, streams etc..I think the trout are hanging around there and out in the bigger river, then venture further upstream when the waters are high in the spring. Otherwise, the brook trout here are going against nature itself as they do migrate and spawn in the fall...no spring. Just my opinion though. Anybody have other theories? As I said this has been a puzzle for me for a long time. Could it be food source they are following?
baby ells elvers i think there called.........
 

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Here we go again..in general terms..a "sea trout" is a brown trout who actually do go into the ocean for up to 2 years at a time....much like salmon.
Then there are "sea run brookies" or as locals call them .."sea trout". They never actually go out into pure salt water but hang around the mouths of rivers etc..feeding and enjoying the high oxygen content. I know that brook trout (actually a member of the char family) spawn in late August into September. So what I am hearing is they start the run upriver in the spring to spawning grounds..3 to 4 months before spawning. Interesting.
Noelco I think you miss read my post, I agree with the "so called sea run" being fish that stay at mouths of rivers, and yes Browns are a true sea bearing fish ! My intentions of the post was to help with the time of the so called "run" alot of ppl. think that there is a date that "sea trout" run well infact the run is based on temperature.If you have a fish holding and feeding below surface they will hold till more options open up. Trout will indeed start an up river journey as long as the conditions allow it. with that being said please remeber they are not like an atlantic salmon and do feed while they are on the journey to spawn. My point is do a little homework whether it be a silver brookie or a beautiful red and orange log your catches and the enviroment that you were in !
 

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Noelco, I agree with what you're saying, but I think it may be something other than the Bay of Fundy causing this. I have no idea what, but brookies run up the Caines and other rivers in the Miramichi system around this time of year, and that doesn't empty into the Bay of Fundy. Again, I agree that the run is much earlier here, but I'm not sure it's the tide in the Bay that cause it.
 

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Hey Noelco, just so ya know, in rivers in Kent County (and likely others along the east coast as well) there is always a run of bigger sea-run brookies on as of the opening week or so, and then later on the bigger run of smaller fish peak last week of June 'till first week of July.
 
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