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I went out fishing this past weekend and both of the rivers I fished were full of gaspereau does this mean the sea trout have already passed by or do the sea trout go up river after the gaspereau? I have always thought the sea trout go up before the gaspereau but someone at work told me the trout go up after.
 

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i've heard that the sea run is after the gaspereau run but I am wondering if this wold be the second run haven't heard many people catching any from the start of the season
 

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Trout come first, then gaspereau. Once gaspereau are in, trout fishing is done for the year.
 

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Yep, as sure as sure can be!
Unless you're willing to pursue the seatrout way up river. In many cases, that's not always possible, as you have to be able to hit every hole along the way in search of them. But generally, the gaspereau will "push" the sea trout up river.
 

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well I think we need another opinion I've heard the opposite, trout will scatter when the gaspereau are arround after they leave the trout come out and eat their eggs
wonder if there is somewhere we could find the answer?
 

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Fished the cocagne river in Notre Dame yesterday caught a couple of small trout but the water was churning all over would like to now if that was gasper's or not and will the trout come in after they leave I always heard they follow them up.
 

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Trout come first, then gaspereau. Once gaspereau are in, trout fishing is done for the year.
Hmmm - Little River would seem to be contradicting that statement (although if feeds in/out of the Petitcodiac River) - Petitcodiac River and North River, seem to be bang on in agreement with that statement

Haven't been up to the Lakes in Albert County yet - however I have been told they are producing very well - and I do not mean any of the stocked lakes in the park!!
 

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I guess no one really knows what is up with Gaspereau and see trouts? I'm in Balmoral and fish the Eel River quite a bit and for the last few years, even more so since they started to tare down the Dam in Charlo (Eel River Bar), all we see in the river is Gaspereau. Haven't seen any sea trout runs for a # of years now, I'm wondering what is up with this.
For the last 2 years they blocked the river with cages to see what is coming up river and everyday since spring they get anywheres from 600-800 gaspereaus in them cages
the odd brookie but no sea trout. You would think that they would only come up at high tide, but was there again this morning and low tide and you could probably could walk on them to cross the river.

Last year I was talking with a fellow who works with the schools and a salmon program they have to stock the rivers and he was saying that the gaspereaus were up every salmon rivers around, Restigouche as far up and Kedgwick, Matapedia, Cascapedia, New Richmond etc.he was saying that they never seen as many Gaspereaus in those rivers before,
mind you salmon fishing was really good last year
 

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Ok to clear the air Gaspereaux or technically known as Alewife are a type of herring. They enter the rivers coincidently at the same time that our small population of sea trout do(May-June). They have a a tendency to move back and forth between the estuary where the water is brackish or has litte salt content and fresher water. Once they are done spawning the surviving adults head back to sea, the same as smelts do.The young leave the freshwater between July and November and will have grown to about 1.5-6 inches. Most of our trout are not sea trout they are trout which live in the larger part of our brooks, strreams and rivers. Do they follow the Gaspereau, no just a coincidence, do they feed on gaspereau eggs? Yes absolutely but trout will also feed on Shad roe as well as anything else they can consume. They are opportunistic eaters and try to achieve as much energy returned on their food source versus energy expelled. Thus the reason that they can become pretty picky when a hatch is going on. Trout live down stream as the water temps are usually warmer and then as the temps warm up through the spring into summer they begin to move up the system. However there are trout which move up and down the entire season.

There's alot of science to the above as I do alot of reading, the above is the coles notes version....anyway bottom line sea trout or not the initial big runs that we see moving up our streams are pretty much done. The migration that now takes place means that you now have to play chase up the river system!

Get out there and enjoy, and remember catch and release works especially if you plan on fishing tomorrow!
 
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