New Brunswick Fishing Forum banner

1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
208 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
One of the lakes I fish has semi-clear balls submerged in the shallows. I was fishing close to lily pads in about 4 feet of water when I saw the first one. I thought it was a child's ball that had sunk. Then I saw several more in the same area and tried to get one to shore with my paddle. It broke about 2 feet from shore and didn't have anythimg inside. No I wasn't drinking or doing any drugs. Plan on fishing this lake again this weekend and I'n taking my camera. Anyone else ever encounter these strange balls or have any idea what they are?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
50 Posts
I haven't, personally. How big are these clear, round balls? Pebble size, nickel size, quarter size/dollar size, golf ball size, tennis ball size, soccer ball size, beach ball?

Just to give me an idea.

If they are smaller in size, i'd think along the lines of an egg of some sort.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
208 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
They are various sizes. My father-in-law found one about the size of a golf ball. Some are that size , some are baseball size, the one I tried to get to shore was not quite as big as a soccer ball but close. They are full of water and break as soon as they are lifted from the water.I checked on the internet and so far have had no luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,727 Posts
it could be bubble nests. stickle backs make them but it doesn't sound quite right. that's the only thing i can think of.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
i saw the same things in french lake we pulled one fromthe lake
and it was as big as a basketball clear jelly when you broke it apart but no sign on any fish fry that we could see and no smell coing from it they are all over the lower end of the portablo there i have never notice seeing these before fishing
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,727 Posts
we may be dealing with an invasive species here...! lets face it, one of us should have seen this before. hey, dnr/dfo we have a problem maybe you should look into this.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,326 Posts
we may be dealing with an invasive species here...! lets face it, one of us should have seen this before. hey, dnr/dfo we have a problem maybe you should look into this.
I saw the same kind of thing in the Hammond River. They were actually in some of the pools left from the lower water levels and not in the running water. I think they are a form of algae, I put my hand in and it was a clear green slime.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
428 Posts
we may be dealing with an invasive species here...! lets face it, one of us should have seen this before. hey, dnr/dfo we have a problem maybe you should look into this.
I've seen these things for years in ritchie lake and other waters. Nothing new, but I'm still not 100% sure that they are just old amphibian egg sacs, but it makes most sense.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,727 Posts
hey bobazumi - great name!!! bob's my hero!!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
29 Posts
i think they may be the gel that is left from frogs eggs after the tadpoles leave the egg mass . my opinion only ..
I must agree, I find frog eggs all the time, and they are always very jelly, remains will usually stay until the fall, when fish begin to take over the shallows. I once saw a pod of frog eggs the size of a truck tire (transport truck, not a pickup), I imagine a couple of frogs laid eggs in the same area and they got pushed together by the current.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
208 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
They aren't frog's eggs. The outside is almost like plastic in appearance. You can roll them around with a paddle. Frog's eggs are in a jelly cloud the tadpoles eat their way out of. It's good to hear they are present in other lakes.(I think????)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,727 Posts
it looks like i've probabaley found the answer. i was watching wfn the other night and one of the "my lake" little features mentioned them, saying they are a form of algie that has been showing up in a number of lakes. apparently they are around most times but are controled by protozoa, so they don't normally develop enough to form the balls. when the lake/water gets zebra mussels the mussels devistate the local little stuff like protozoa and the algie dominates it's food zone and forms the balls full of algie. this seems right anyway, and the zebra muscles are getting around, although by the sounds of it anything that affected the othere stuff this algie competes with would have the same results.
we would need some samples to check for sure.
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top