New Brunswick Fishing Forum banner
1 - 20 of 36 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I was out last night at 6:30 for about 45minutes doing some fishing behind the main street superstore in Fredericton. I figured I would catch a couple pickeral and maybe a bass or two back there as that what it always was growing up for me.
I was there 15minutes without a bite using a red devil so switched up to a mepps. first cast i got a bite and it felt "heavy" and fought pretty well thought it was a bass at first but then when i got it close to shore I seen it's length and markings and knew it to be a muskie. When I finally landed the fish i measured it's length at 26 inches TL

It was my first muskie and found them really fun to fish (especially on an ultra light rod heh) But must admit i was really surprised to find a muskie so far into the nasis stream from the St. John river. I expected them at the mouth of the river like they have been in the Nashwaak but not that distance.

My question is... Has anyone been catching these fish any distance away from the St. John river?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
184 Posts
So I was out last night at 6:30 for about 45minutes doing some fishing behind the main street superstore in Fredericton. I figured I would catch a couple pickeral and maybe a bass or two back there as that what it always was growing up for me.
I was there 15minutes without a bite using a red devil so switched up to a mepps. first cast i got a bite and it felt "heavy" and fought pretty well thought it was a bass at first but then when i got it close to shore I seen it's length and markings and knew it to be a muskie. When I finally landed the fish i measured it's length at 26 inches TL

It was my first muskie and found them really fun to fish (especially on an ultra light rod heh) But must admit i was really surprised to find a muskie so far into the nasis stream from the St. John river. I expected them at the mouth of the river like they have been in the Nashwaak but not that distance.

My question is... Has anyone been catching these fish any distance away from the St. John river?
Congrats on your first Muskie!! might be a runt, but a little muskie is still a muskie!

I've heard reports of Muskies caught in the Gasperau nets in the grand lake system. Also i'm sure many of the SJ River's tributaries have some Big n' Toothies in em. Many of the lakes that are connected to the river farther north (glazier etc) Have some too.

A friend of mine hooked and lost a small muskie in the Nasis stream last year too so i'm guessing it's a sort of nursery. Theres chub and perch and bullheads aplenty back there so it's a great place for little muskies to grow up.

Muskies should only be around in waters connected to the SJ River as they are not indigenous to NB. They were stocked in a lake in Quebec (some say maine) and found thier way into the SJ River about 20-30 years ago.

If you're ever looking to get into some bigger ones I'd be happy to help you out!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I was there again tuesday night and didn't get anything. seen a few small perch chasing my bait but thats about all. A couple fellows went by in a boat and they mentioned they hadn't had so much as a bite either from the mouth of the stream to behind the superstore. I did see a few small fish jumping near the opposite shore but didn't have anything take the bait when i cast over that way.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
I got one today in the Nashwaak. It looked to be about 4' in the water. I got her up to the bank and just as I was about to grab it and the toothy beast took a last run and broke the line. This was just past the Marysville bridge. This is not a good sign for anyone looking to fish trout in the river.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I was out in the nasis stream a few weeks back. me an a buddy put his canoe in behind the superstore and went upstream a ways. This was when the water was still really high. Trolled for a ways and then worked our way to the mouth of the stream. tied up to a tree and fished the mouth of the nasis stream for an hour or so. not a thing biting all day. he was a little disappointed as he was hoping to hook into a muskie (even a little one) while he was up visiting.

FlyFreak.. So you were fishing up the nashwaak river? I wouldn't think that muskie would be up so far as marysville, that doesn't sound all that good at all for the trout.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Well I think unless the water is higher they won't make it farther then that as there are some very shallow rapids right there.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
250 Posts
Be sure and kill every freaking one of them you catch; they are invasive species and feed on anything up to half their length! Watch out salmon and trout stocks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
492 Posts
and so it goes. Kill them or embrace them? Like it or not, it is extremely unlikely that we can kill them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
250 Posts
and so it goes. Kill them or embrace them? Like it or not, it is extremely unlikely that we can kill them.
You are probably right; I just hate to admit it. I'll probably end up flyfishing for the ugly monsters myself lol.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
184 Posts
"But institute director and fish biologist Dr. Allen Curry says salmon is not on the muskie menu. "Fish that muskie like to eat - perch and suckers and white perch and brown bullheads and minnows - there are lots of those fish out there, and that's what the muskies seem to be eating," he said."

Sm Bass are much more plentyful and eagerly eat trout and salmon parr, but we are encouraged to let every one of them go so the tournament anglers can catch them and hopefully win some money. how many trout and landlocked salmon lakes once had good numbers before bass took over? too many.

so if we can embrace the voracious bass that destroy populations of the "finer fish" than why not embrace the muskie that eats catfish and suckers? if salmon were introduced into a system that has never supported them would there be the same outcry to kill every one you catch? and what about the rumors or walleye and carp in the SJ river system? why isnt anybody calling for eradication of these fish? Rainbow and Brown trout are also introduced and often outcompete brook trout and salmon, but we love these fish dearly do we not?

my point is (for the umpteenth time) Muskies are here to stay and no amount of angler pressure will ever change this fact. is it really so hard 30 years after thier introduction to accept this fact and perhaps target them as a the sport fish that could well be the largest fish you've ever caught? it's not the fish's fault they got here it's ours.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
250 Posts
Fisherpunk,

You sound tired of explaining to folks like me that Muskies are here to stay and should be embraced as sportfish; I get that. I'm thinking you could have never experienced the thrill of an Atlantic Salmon taking your fly and speeding off across the St John river leaping as it goes into your backing line. Thirty years ago that was a common thing and I'll never forget it, nor will I ever as you put it, "embrace" muskie or any other garbage fish that some nut "introduces" into our coldwater fishery, including smallmouth bass.

As for Dr. Curry, he obviously has an interest in seeing muskie designated as sportfish and protected like the bass are now. He claims muskie don't have salmon on their menu; only other garbage fish and "minnows". I'm sure they sift through the minnows to make sure there are no fry among them! Anyway I don't dispute the fact they are here to stay etc etc ad nauseum. I just don't like like people telling me I need to "embrace" the the ugly creatures that are displacing the most awesome creatures that have graced the St. John river for centuries.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
449 Posts
Wannafish,I believe the demise of the Atlantic salmon in the Saint John river began with the construction of dams and the human controlled select movemnet of fish around them. Overfishing on the open ocean was probably a contributing factor as well.I have experienced Atlantic salmon on the fly and caught muskies as well.There is no comparison as to the power and stamina of the salmon,the muskie just can't measure up. However I enjoy fishing for both and believe the return of Atlantic salmon to the Saint Jihn river will only have a chance with the installation of fishways around Mactaquac and Beechwood dams. Dr. Currie and his group studied the muskie to determine their distribution,movements,and effect on the Saint John river ecosytem. Radio tags tracked their movement and stomach content analysis determined what their main prey consisted of. To imply that Dr.Currie had some interest in seeing Muskies designated as a protected sport fish is a pretty big assumption. I would love to see salmon return to their former numbers on the Saint John river system but I don't believe you can blame the muskies for their decline. They may or may not be another obstacle they face in making a comeback.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
449 Posts
From Dr. Currys report

Abstract

The muskellunge was introduced in the Saint John River system from stockings in a headwater lake in the 1970s. They have migrated down the system as far as the river's first dam, Mactaquac Hydroelectric Facility, at Fredericton and appear to have established several reproducing populations along the river. This exotic invader represents a potential threat to the severely depleted Atlantic salmon stocks in the river. We radio-tracked muskellunge over a 2-year period in the middle reaches. Home ranges extended to ~100 km in both riverine and lacustrine areas, including 78% of individuals trans-located upstream of the dam making their way back through the dam successfully. Downstream of the dam, home ranges were <25 km. No spawning areas were detected. An isotope analyses of diet indicated that the large sub-adults and adults had established the greatest proportion of their biomass in a more [sup]15[/sup]N depleted environment typical of areas farther upstream. Isotope mixing models could not accurately determine the proportion of Atlantic salmon smolts that may have been consumed by muskellunge, but anadromous salmon had ≤7% probabilities of being in the diet. A bioenergetics model suggested ≤5% of the annual food intake by muskellunge occurs during the smolt out-migration period. For the Saint John River, the impacts of growing numbers of muskellunge are multi-faceted creating a complex management challenge. Muskellunge appear to minimally increase predation risk for Atlantic salmon smolts while their increasing numbers are creating a growing recreational fishery and potential threat to the native fish community and ecosystem.
 
1 - 20 of 36 Posts
Top