New Brunswick Fishing Forum banner
1 - 20 of 31 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
37 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I hear of guys going 4 to 7 years but I imagine they didn't actually put many hours a year actually fishing. I probably have have 60 to 80 hours in so far over the past 5-6 weeks but I feel I'm getting closer with the fall coming. I got impatient this morning and left a pool after 1.5 to 2 hours, went to the second pool to find someone fishing it so I went back to the first pool (this guy eventually caught a grilse 30 mins after I turned around). When I got back to the first pool, two guys were fishing and one had caught a grilse. I am fishing crown pools that have fish but also fishermem.

So how many hours before you caught your first?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
64 Posts
It all depends on being in the right spot at the right time. Sounds like you were close last time out. I was with a buddy Canada Day weekend and he caught his first salmon in ten minutes, and it was a 15 pound beauty. If you're putting yourself in pools where fish are being taken, you should have one in no time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
250 Posts
I would also like to add, Moose, from watching my son catch his first two this summer; keep your casts short enough that they lay out nicely and less than 45 degree angle to the shoreline. I was hooking fish behind him and he wondered why so I suggested he try those two things; the same day he landed his first two grilse.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
106 Posts
Really good tips by Wannafish. I've never really become a good caster, just don't seem to have it in me, but I still seem to catch my share of grilse and salmon mostly by keeping my casts shorter so they land better and straighter. If you're having trouble landing your line straight (like I do when I start extending my casts), give a quick (short) strip when it lands to pull the leader straight before it starts to swing so that you're tight to the fly, and the fly will swing normally and not speed up and look unnatural. If you've put in that many hours without a fish yet - you're due in a big way - keep at er', and you'll be into some before the season's out. Good luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Wow I smiled when I saw this thread. I myself asked the same thing early this year as I have been on 3 crown reserve trips (mostly adams pool), open water at the Dungarvon and South Branch and Juniper and have never caught a salmon. After about 15 trips, hours on the water and 1000's of dollar in gear, gas and BEvERages that go along with these trips I got the monkey off my back this year. It started the second day of black salmon when I caught my first from shore. In a sense this was my first salmon although it still didnt feel right. Earlier this Summer I had a trip to Crawford and caught and landed my first bright. It is a priceless feeling I soon won't forget and worth all the time, earling mornings and money.

I have always considered myself a good trout fisherman as I began trampling through the brooks and rivers in elementary school. Although Fly fishing is something I picked up and learned on my own as I never really had family or friends who enjoyed the sport. I attribute this to all the time it took me to catch my first fish. I also got all my buddies into the sport so we were in a sense all learning together. Until I started watching and listening to seasoned vets and practicing I didnt feel comfortable getting out and going shoulder to shoulder in the public pools. I feel the "on the job" training is key so if you have friends and family that fish go with them and they will help you out as well practice is key. Keep it up and I am sure in no time you will be posting a pic of your first salmon. Best of luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
It took me 6 years and I finally caught my first salmon about 3 weeks ago...... I would have never thought my first fish would be a 34inch hen salmon!!! Keep casting....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
111 Posts
Great advice by all!! The only thing I could add is don't get frustrated...like others have said "shorten the casts" and concentrate on where you put the fly....cast just ahead of likely lies and control your speed and angle...speed and angle of the fly is way more important in salmon fishing than fly selection itself. Good luck and it will come ....Tight Lines and remember every one that you put back is one that will be there to spawn
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
55 Posts
Great advice by all!! The only thing I could add is don't get frustrated...like others have said "shorten the casts" and concentrate on where you put the fly....cast just ahead of likely lies and control your speed and angle...speed and angle of the fly is way more important in salmon fishing than fly selection itself. Good luck and it will come ....Tight Lines and remember every one that you put back is one that will be there to spawn
Excellent points. I have said in other threads that timing (time of day, water temp/height), conditions etc and presentation are more important than fly selection imo. It is easy to go into a pool and flog the water and by not being disciplined and strategic about the fly presentation, you end up wasting your time. Approach pools carefully, with stealth and start with a short cast, eventually lengthening the line and cover the water with a purpose. I am no expert and still cant cast that far compared to other anglers, but practice makes perfect and I am sure you learn something each time you go out as do I. I have fished with frustration as my more experienced partner caught fish while following behind me in the same pool. He had a better presentation and the fish picked his fly over mine even though it was the same type of fly.
You dont have many chances to make a first impression to the fish, so make that presentation perfect before it sees too many poorly presented flies go by and gets tight lipped.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
298 Posts
Excellent points. I have said in other threads that timing (time of day, water temp/height), conditions etc and presentation are more important than fly selection imo. It is easy to go into a pool and flog the water and by not being disciplined and strategic about the fly presentation, you end up wasting your time. Approach pools carefully, with stealth and start with a short cast, eventually lengthening the line and cover the water with a purpose. I am no expert and still cant cast that far compared to other anglers, but practice makes perfect and I am sure you learn something each time you go out as do I. I have fished with frustration as my more experienced partner caught fish while following behind me in the same pool. He had a better presentation and the fish picked his fly over mine even though it was the same type of fly.
You dont have many chances to make a first impression to the fish, so make that presentation perfect before it sees too many poorly presented flies go by and gets tight lipped.
Korlando.. I have to agree and I'm no expert either but my experiance with knowing that if waters are getting slapped it will kill a pool in a heartbeat. Myself and Chadman were at a pool not too long ago and it was 1st thing in the AM. there were 2 other gents there as well and one of them came right out and said he was new to flyfishing. Both chad and I suggested that those guys go 1st through the pool. Not saying they killed the pool with not knowing the science of salmon fishing. but it was clear that we had to move on .. we did and 10 min. after reaching a different pool we were into fish ! I do believe there is a way to fish salmon to better the chances. I was on the river in my early stages of salmon fishing and this gent asked me a question. " your not a hunter are ya " .. I said no he said well slapping the water like that is like running through the woods letting off a shot every 5 seconds. it's fun doing it but you get no results
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
250 Posts
I totally agree with you Zamboni! How did you take the constructive criticism?
Sometimes I'd like to say something like that to a newer fisherman but worry it won't be received well. The thing I notice most often (and it's not only new fishermen) is wading too deep and aiming a cast for the bushes on the opposite shore (or so it seems). In Juniper especially the fish are often laying only a few feet from shore and a 30 foot cast would do the trick even at only 30 to 40 degree angle from the shoreline; of course if you can lay out an eighty foot cast nicely then go ahead because you will cover more water, but if it piles up and you have to rip it off the water and try again you're really defeating the purpose!
Someone once told me a guide on the Restigouche told him that women he guided usually had more hook-ups than the men; a fact he attributed to their shorter casts and thus better swing of the fly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
39 Posts
haha, i totally agree with the thread and the slapping of the water made me think of my first fish. I only started fly fishing about 5 years ago now,, i'm no expert and i enjoy trying to improve my cast every chance i get on the water. I love watching and talking with other fishermen, there is always something to learn.

getting back to the topic tho, the very first time i went fly fishing i went with a few people i knew who fly fished, and just expected to be guided or helped to a certain point right,, that was my expectations anyway.. however it didn't really work out that way. once i got my rod together, the other guys were already gone,, i had no clue how to even tie the fly on,, had an idea for some reason,, so i went with it, right or wrong i don't remember. Finally get to the water, everyone casting away.. i plant myself in the middle of two people.. and started slapping away,, within about 30 mins i had comments that i scared all the fish away,, and the fly has to be in the water for a fish to take it,, needless to say i wasn't having a great time on my first fly fishing trip, so i went and sat down, took out a bunch of knots out of my line, ate my lunch that i packed,, letting everyone fish away and one guy decided the to leave, so i thought i'll go stand there and try this again,, everyone had got out of the water at this point,, and BAM i had these big tugs on the line,, had no idea what was going on, and then the grisle rockets out of the water and it was fish on!! don't worry i know it was a total fluke, cause it took two years before i got another one!! If i had not caught that fish that day, i often wonder if i'd even be fishing today,, but because i did, i was hooked, i went the rest of the summer without anything,, then i went another season with nothing again, i was back to square one,, i'll never get a fish again.. then on yr three, late in the yr it was fall i think, i hooked a salmon on a dry fly!! I fish almost only dry fly now, sure i'll try wet depending on the conditions,, but i love dry fly! watching the fly float and seeing the take, amazing!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
105 Posts
I agree with all the tips I am reading on this topic. When I started fishing(more than 50 years ago) my mentor gave me 4 tips. Cast short. Keep your line straight. Don't wade out too deep. KEEP YOUR FLY IN THE WATER. I was lucky because there were plenty of salmon in the rivers back then and it only took a few hours before I hooked my first fish. Now landing one was a different story!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
64 Posts
All rookies should be referred to this thread.


Another tip I was given many years ago... Instead of assembling your rod and reel up by your car, bring your rod and reel to the river's edge and watch the river while you assemble your rod, thread your line through, tie on a fly, etc. And always make sure you're facing the river while you are doing this. By the time you are ready to fish, you may see one or two reveal themselves. As hard as it can be sometimes, I try to take ten minutes before I start fishing just to sit back and watch the pool. Unless it's a pool you've fished many times and know exactly where they usually lie.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
576 Posts
this has to be one of the best threads I've seen on here in a while

I agree with GreenButt re all rookies see above.. however it's always good reminders for any seasoned flyfisherman too
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
111 Posts
As hard as it can be sometimes, I try to take ten minutes before I start fishing just to sit back and watch the pool.
That is The secret right there!!! I never hurry to get to the front of the line and fish a pool first when angling with others...I prefer last....alot of people think I'm just being kind by letting them go ahead....LOL...NO I'm studying the pool.....If alone I will sit and watch the pool for 20-30 minutes before entering it to fish.

Keep the casts short, never ever wade out too far....most of the time if the ankles on your wading boots are wet your deep enough, keep your fly in the water.....fish every cast through its swing even the horrible ones, last but not least HAVE FUN....if your not enjoying your time on the water then it isn't worth being there cause contrary to popular thought...IT AIN'T ALL ABOUT HOOKING FISH
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
395 Posts
I am probably a very lucky person I guess.... my uncle told me that day, and every day I go fishing with him (do you remember your first time, this was beginner lucks only..lol "he was telling me he took like 3-4 years before he caught his first grilse) .

I started salmon fishing 4 years ago, first time at the pool with my uncle, never fly fish before either (except the previous night I was practicing my cast in a dirt road).

Short story, I hooked my first 22 inches grilse in less than 3-4 minutes - 25 minutes after I was back at my truck heading home with my 1st grilse, so since that day I AM HOOKED!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
That is The secret right there!!! I never hurry to get to the front of the line and fish a pool first when angling with others...I prefer last....alot of people think I'm just being kind by letting them go ahead....LOL...NO I'm studying the pool.....If alone I will sit and watch the pool for 20-30 minutes before entering it to fish.

Keep the casts short, never ever wade out too far....most of the time if the ankles on your wading boots are wet your deep enough, keep your fly in the water.....fish every cast through its swing even the horrible ones, last but not least HAVE FUN....if your not enjoying your time on the water then it isn't worth being there cause contrary to popular thought...IT AIN'T ALL ABOUT HOOKING FISH
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
laHaves says it all. "It aint all about hooking fish".....Ive fished for over 40 years, and as a youngster fishing with my uncles, I learned real quick about the beauty and time spent fishing. They use to tell me, "it's just a bonus if we catch a fish"
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
37 Posts
Discussion Starter · #19 ·
wow..thanks guys, never anticipated this response level. Good news...hooked and landed my first grilse/salmon around 9 - 9:30 this am. I fished all three mornings this weekend and had a feeling I was getting close. I fished a private pool (locals said it was ok - learned a lesson there) on Sunday morning and was asked to leave as it was under lease (turns out my father knows the person very well..so I have been give full access). This morning I showed up and fished the pool very slow with a gliter bear fly and it took about 2 hours (saw 1 salmon roll in the same spot as Sunday). Took a small break to eat something and changed to an alley shrimp (was going to put a green machine on but my friend didn't give it back on sunday). 10 to 15 short tight casts later (near where the salmon rolled earlier) I felt a big tug. I immediately pulled tight, the salmon didn't run so I started reeling, he rolled about 6 times and swam toward me. It wouldn't let me grab near its fin but didn't try to spped off. 4 or 5 tries later it was over (only took about 2 mins). I pulled the hook out (barbless as per a suggestion in another thread) and held it in the water for 1.5 to 2 mins until it wanted to swim away. Dark fish. I noticed 3 or 4 hook marks when I was pulling the hook out. Not sure how long it was but while I revived it I was eyeing it in my hands and felt it was at least 2 feet (guessing 22 to 26 inches).

On my way home I stopped and talked to the owner and thanked them.

I have a question on this comment..."Keep your line straight". I noticed when I cast more than 45 degree the line flows down stream in the shape of a hook (rapids mostly - I assume that's wrong) So I guess I should only cast 45 degrees or less and make sure the line doesn't bend? Does this apply to dry fly when 45 degree up stream?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
64 Posts
wow..thanks guys, never anticipated this response level. Good news...hooked and landed my first grilse/salmon around 9 - 9:30 this am. I fished all three mornings this weekend and had a feeling I was getting close. I fished a private pool (locals said it was ok - learned a lesson there) on Sunday morning and was asked to leave as it was under lease (turns out my father knows the person very well..so I have been give full access). This morning I showed up and fished the pool very slow with a gliter bear fly and it took about 2 hours (saw 1 salmon roll in the same spot as Sunday). Took a small break to eat something and changed to an alley shrimp (was going to put a green machine on but my friend didn't give it back on sunday). 10 to 15 short tight casts later (near where the salmon rolled earlier) I felt a big tug. I immediately pulled tight, the salmon didn't run so I started reeling, he rolled about 6 times and swam toward me. It wouldn't let me grab near its fin but didn't try to spped off. 4 or 5 tries later it was over (only took about 2 mins). I pulled the hook out (barbless as per a suggestion in another thread) and held it in the water for 1.5 to 2 mins until it wanted to swim away. Dark fish. I noticed 3 or 4 hook marks when I was pulling the hook out. Not sure how long it was but while I revived it I was eyeing it in my hands and felt it was at least 2 feet (guessing 22 to 26 inches).

On my way home I stopped and talked to the owner and thanked them.

I have a question on this comment..."Keep your line straight". I noticed when I cast more than 45 degree the line flows down stream in the shape of a hook (rapids mostly - I assume that's wrong) So I guess I should only cast 45 degrees or less and make sure the line doesn't bend? Does this apply to dry fly when 45 degree up stream?
That's great news Moose... Congrats! A salmon virgin no more. Based on your story, I suspect you next fish will give you even bigger rush. When you say he 'rolled 6 times' I'm wondering if perhaps he wrapped the line around his mouth. When they do that it can take a lot of the fight out of them, explaining why you were able to get him in within a couple of minutes, and could also explain the marks you saw. Who knows. The main thing is that your cut your teeth. Glad to hear it was all barbless. I told you they can be tricky to tail! Haha. Until this summer I always tried to tail them. Now I just slide my fingers down the leader and keep the fishes head on top of the water as I grab the hook and give a twist. That way you don't even need to touch them. You may want to pick up a $2 mini tape measure at Home Hardware... great for measuring fish quickly, and really light for your vest.

What you are describing as 'bend' is exactly what the guys above are telling you re: keeping your line straight. Bending is not good (although everyone has a story or two about hooking one during a bend). The more straight (less bend) the better. Dry fly fishing upstream is somewhat different. Because your line is coming back at you, I try to take in line with my hand as the fly floats back, helping to ensure a nice hookup. Depending on the river current, bending is not usually an issue. Just make sure your fly is not being sucked by the current and is being pulled across the water. This time of years it's nice to fish down the pool with a wet, and up the pool with a dry. Depending on if you have the pool to yourself. I'm happy for you man. Cheers.
 
1 - 20 of 31 Posts
Top