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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The Hammond broke with all that rain and warm weather we had a few days ago. The ice is jammed up and both bridges quite a bit. The ice chunks are all over the fields and riverbanks. If we get some more rain and sunshine hopefully it will break loose and we'll get an early tidal water start. Any other spots in the rivers opening up yet?
 

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On Friday I noticed large sections of open water on the St John River here in Fredericton. Certainly the river was not broken up, as most of it was still covered, but it is a start.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Yes, they will most likely run earlier as the water will warm sooner. The "sea" trout are truly just river trout that hang around the river all winter feeding on smelt, shrimp and whatever else they can find. I would think very few cross the harbour bridge as there would be no need. I've had days were I've caught 10-15 trout before the season opens in tidal waters, however, I've yet to repeat that success. That was an exceptional early April that year and I had the boat out the last week of March, but could have had it out two weeks sooner.

The upper Kennebecasis in Penobsquis to Sussex from what I could see from the highway, looked perfect for fishing, too bad it's a month away.

A few posters reported catching salmon in late November or early December last year and I know of someone who caught trout in the river while sturgeon fishing late in the fall, so many trout and salmon are already out of the rivers and brooks by December I would estimate, except for the few that can't make it out of the upper stretches due to low water. I believe there were reports of large trout in the Kennebecasis that actually went down river in early spring as shown by trap nets or radio tracking. I had caught a 17" trout on the first day of the season in the Hammond many years ago that was dark as could be and full of nymphs, which I think suggests that it stayed either in the Palmer Brook mouth all winter, or just descended from the brook or upper river. It was no fighter in comparison to a fresh "sea" trout that would be more silver in color. By the way, it is what they feed on, not the water that dicates the color of the trout. A trout that concentrates on smelt in a lake will appear just as silver as a "sea" trout. Landloch salmon can appear very dark if they feed on nymphs and other invertebrates.
 

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huh, interesting, i caught a 17 incher in may.. and it was plugged with nymphs and it had a lil' silver coloration but for the most part it was just "normal" brook trout colours... caught that trout on a sedge pattern i tied myself..( my own pattern)....
 
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