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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm just looking for opinions on fly rods, I would use it for muskie, salmon, stripers, and bass and pickerel on the side until I get a lighter rod. I was thinking a 9wt or 10wt. My biggest worry is muskie just because they fight so hard, and like I said, I would be getting a different rod for bass and pickerel once I have enough money again.
Thanks
 

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I've handled many fish in the Niagara River on my 8 wt. The Niagara is of course a large turbulent river. These include Chinook Salmon, Steelhead, Brown Trout and the like. I haven't had any issues yet. I'm not too sure where Striper would fit into the equation as I have never caught one before... but I hope that changes in 3 weeks. The only thing I would say is make sure you go at least 9' and aim for 10' in length. The 8wt will be well served with bass as well. I think it'll handle the musky just fine as it handles the pike well.

Alex
 

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I'm using a 10wt TFO four piece rod with an okuma integrity I 10/11. I've never caught a muskie or striper on it yet but have landed some pretty respectable salmon, over 3ft with it. I like the ten weight but it's a personal prefernece, I find that it's a little better casting in windy conditions. I would highly recommend the TFO rods as a good value for the money.

Bill G.

PS - I use a 7 wt for LLS and bass trolling
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I probably could've mentioned this before, my worries are casting large flies for muskie and stripers, not actually fishing the fish.
 

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I probably could've mentioned this before, my worries are casting large flies for muskie and stripers, not actually fishing the fish.
If you're concerned with casting large flies.. say soaked rabbit strip.. and you're casting in open areas like flats/beaches then you definitely wanna go bigger. I know that you mentioned that you want to catch bass and have a stop gap until you get a smaller rod... go with a 10' 9wt. Give Albright a look if you don't want to spend top dollar and get a decent product.

Alex
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thank you everyone, I will tell you when I purchase the rod, which may not be for some time now, I don't know yet.
 

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Thank you everyone, I will tell you when I purchase the rod, which may not be for some time now, I don't know yet.
Fly casting technique, more often so than the rod that propels the fly has to do with getting the fly on target. I cast salmon bombers and big muddlers with my #3 weight up to 50ft. The lighter rod will require more finess and open looped type casting.

For your consideration, and depending on your fly casting prowess, I would recommend no less than 8 or 9, 10 being a bit on the heavy for a novice fly caster. If you're an accomplished fly caster, than a 10 on a #9 fast action can produce great results.

Good luck.
 

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Hey guys,

I'm wondering what a good size fly rod would be for trout, but also the odd bass and pickerel. I want something that will be good for those medium fish, like a bass or pickerel, but not too bloated from trout fishing the brooks/rivers.

I am thinking of ordering a new fly rod off of Cabela's, perhaps. If they ship to Canada, and if the shipping isn't absurd.

So, would 7 ft, 8 ft, 9 ft? And, what other numbers should I know!

I want something not too big, not too small.. if you understand what I mean. I want to be able to go after trout, or if i decide to, pickerel and bass. (maybe even Salmon), if a rod could work for all four species!

Thanks in advance.
 

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Hey guys,

I'm wondering what a good size fly rod would be for trout, but also the odd bass and pickerel. I want something that will be good for those medium fish, like a bass or pickerel, but not too bloated from trout fishing the brooks/rivers.

I am thinking of ordering a new fly rod off of Cabela's, perhaps. If they ship to Canada, and if the shipping isn't absurd.

So, would 7 ft, 8 ft, 9 ft? And, what other numbers should I know!

I want something not too big, not too small.. if you understand what I mean. I want to be able to go after trout, or if i decide to, pickerel and bass. (maybe even Salmon), if a rod could work for all four species!

Thanks in advance.
For trout with the intention of sometimes fishing bass or pickerel, I would recommend a 6 weight line on an 8 or 9 foot rod. A 4-piece 9 foot rod would be my personal preference. The 6 weight will cast the larger flies like streamers, leeches, etc that you will want to use on the warm water fish. It will also easily handle small flies and not thrash too much water around when you are fishing in creeks and streams for trout. It is not a great choice for larger fish that are inclined to run, like salmon or striped bass. You really need a second rod for that. (And then you will need a third, fourth and fifth, but we will just ignore the ugly truths about addictions for the moment...)

For your first rod, I would highly recommend that you take a drive and visit a dedicated fly shop instead of placing an internet order. I would personally recommend WW Doak, Fredericton Outfitters and I have heard good things about Eskape Anglers in Riverview. They all have web sites. Guys in those shops will talk with you about what you want to fish and will recommend good outfits. They all carry less expensive gear that is still excellent quality, some of it not shown on their web sites, and they will make sure your reel is set up correctly with good knots from backing to line to leader. Try to go mid-week when they likely have time to talk. I think you will find helpful and knowledgeable people who will want to see you off to a good start.

Happy casting.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Fly casting technique, more often so than the rod that propels the fly has to do with getting the fly on target. I cast salmon bombers and big muddlers with my #3 weight up to 50ft. The lighter rod will require more finess and open looped type casting.

For your consideration, and depending on your fly casting prowess, I would recommend no less than 8 or 9, 10 being a bit on the heavy for a novice fly caster. If you're an accomplished fly caster, than a 10 on a #9 fast action can produce great results.

Good luck.
I used to use a bamboo fly rod, which, and have a lot of trouble casting large flies on smaller weight graphite rods, I'm just not used to the different feel. Its not that I'm a novice, but I have never owned a graphite rod.
 

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meh, you just need to spend more time with the new rod. i find i'm terible if i think about it, fine if i just fish. it takes a little while to build up the body memory again.

i'm learning to fly fish for stripers this year but it's slow going - i feel i need perfect conditions to try it - probabley unrealistic, i just need to go at it for a while, get used to the extra weight and different presentations.

i did find a good piece on line how to make a leader for stripers. it's made up from 4' of 30#mono, 3' of 25# mono, 2' of 20# mono and 12-18" of 17# floro is what they use, i made mine of the same but ended with 20# floro on one for sinking, 17# mono for floating (they actualy said 12" of floro as the final tippet, but that's to short if you are changing flies more than once...)
 

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Well, I currently already own a fly rod.

I have used it some, on a couple of lakes and brooks/streams/rivers...

I have caught some trout and perch on it. But, nothing of any real significant size. The actual size of the rod, I am unsure of. The line, is 6.

I will check the rod size, etc when I go home. I bought it at Canadian Tire one day last year, just to try out some fly fishing. As, the size of the rod by looking I knew would handle small brook trout. So, I didn't pay a ton of attention to detail, as I didn't want to spend a ton learning how to fly fish, and, any fly rod will handle some brookies.

But now that i am getting better at it, i was thinking of trying new species. Some a bit bigger, such as bass and pickerel. Which is why I am wondering the specifics. The rod I have, may actually do justice. I'll have to take a look and see.

Thanks for the feedback guys.
 

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Ipop give me a call if you'd like to try fly fishing for stripers from my boat. Took a while for my hand to heal after that night at the falls, but I'm ready to go anytime. Might be better to try with flies during the day, someplace shallow like toward Hampton. We might also try trolling with flies that way we can try some honkers too big to cast.
 
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