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I'm brand new to this site and to fly fishing. I did a little fly fishing when I was a teenager using other peoples' rods. So I found a great deal at Canadian Tire for a beginner's fly rod- it's probably not very good compared to many peoples' equipment. I'm very hesitant to spend too much as I'm just starting out, but if it would improve things to get a better line and some better flies, then I'd shell out for that kind of stuff.

I went out fishing around the Dieppe area today, and caught nothing. I therefore have some questions about fly fishing. I'd appreciate any help you folks could give me.

My kit came with a few flys including a Royal Coachman. Why did the Royal Coachman fly sink? It didn't stay on the surface as I'd have thought it would, as it is a dry fly. Is it just a crappy fly?

How long should a leader be? Seemed to get snagged a lot, and didn't really work as I imagined it would.

How should a leader be attached to the line? I just knotted it on, and it didn't seem to be the best.

I was trying to catch some trout in some areas with lots of trees and various obstructions. How shoud I cast a fly in a limited area due to trees?

I appreciate your help in advance.
 

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I'm brand new to this site and to fly fishing. I did a little fly fishing when I was a teenager using other peoples' rods. So I found a great deal at Canadian Tire for a beginner's fly rod- it's probably not very good compared to many peoples' equipment. I'm very hesitant to spend too much as I'm just starting out, but if it would improve things to get a better line and some better flies, then I'd shell out for that kind of stuff.

I went out fishing around the Dieppe area today, and caught nothing. I therefore have some questions about fly fishing. I'd appreciate any help you folks could give me.

My kit came with a few flys including a Royal Coachman. Why did the Royal Coachman fly sink? It didn't stay on the surface as I'd have thought it would, as it is a dry fly. Is it just a crappy fly?

How long should a leader be? Seemed to get snagged a lot, and didn't really work as I imagined it would.

How should a leader be attached to the line? I just knotted it on, and it didn't seem to be the best.

I was trying to catch some trout in some areas with lots of trees and various obstructions. How shoud I cast a fly in a limited area due to trees?

I appreciate your help in advance.
Good way to start into it, don't need to spend tons of money until you know weather or not you like it. The royal coachman can be tied wet or dry so you may have gotten a wet style which would make it sink.

Your leader should be roughly the lentgh of your rod, so an 8 foot rod would have roughly an 8 foot leader. The leader is usually tied to the fly line using a nail knot here is a link for tying a nail knot

http://www.animatedknots.com/nailknot/index.php

Hope this helps
 

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Like Jim said, you may have had a wet fly on and not realized it. Or if it was a dry fly, it may have absorbed too much water, making it sink. Usually you can do a few fast juke casts to dry it out.

As for casting in a limited area; you can use the roll cast, depending on where the obstructing trees are located.

Here's a video about casting that I watch from time to time. He has some really good tips and explanations about casting techniques. This is part 3/3, but it opens with the roll cast.
 

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You need to get some fly floatant if you believe it is a Royal Coachman tied as a dry fly. Gink is a good brand, but most liquid silicone floatants works. I don't like the spray stuff. The key is to put the floatant on before you go out fishing to give it ample time to dry. Then, when your fly gets water logged and sinks on every cast, even though you try to dry it with false casting, put that one back in the box and take out a fresh dry fly. You can try drying out your fly by blowing on it and recoating it, but it will not float as long as a fresh pre-treated dry fly.

The guys are right about the roll casts. Also, you can do a steeple cast. Back cast your line straight up in the air and give it a good flick with your wrist to get it shooting straight out. In small treed in brooks I use a short fly rod under 7'.

The general rule is a leader the same length of your rod, however this is not always optimum. Spooky fish sometimes require you to use a long leader, sometimes 12-14'. Fishing with heavy flies or sinking lines sometimes call for 4' leaders. Experimentation with different leader lengths for your presentation style and fly selection is a big part of fly fishing. Some people get very technical with it as it has a big impact on the quality of your casts and presentation. For now, buy tapered knotless leaders designed for your fishing and some 4lb and 8lb tippet spools to replace your tippet section when they start to get short. And remember, if you get a wind knot in your leader or tippet, take it out right away, it will be nothing but headaches, lost flies and lost trophies. When you get into flyfishing more, you will probably tie your own tapered leaders, which will save money and give you a leader more personalized to your style of casting and presentations

You don't need expensive equipment. I've never owned or will own a Sage/orvis/ etc unless it is given to me. I use vintage equipment or affordable new gear and do just fine. I paid more for the backing on my 12wt large arbor reel, than I did for the reel and it was brand new from LL's. Unless your fishing for salmon or big game fish, a fly reel is nothing more than a line holder as you will almost never reel in a trout unless she's a monster. I had a brown trout take 40 feet of line off the reel once in deep water while fishing from the boat. That was the longest run I ever got out of a trout.

Better flies would make a difference. I remember when I was a kid and I was using old flies or crappy tire specials which never floated well, fell apart and didn't have good action etc. Then, my uncle who was a guide gave me some flies tied by Jerome Molloy. That Royal Wulff, which was pretreated with floatant of course, took forever to get soaked, dried out quickly and the fly itselt never wore out after many fish. I think I ended up breaking the hook point off eventually and I remember that the bend looked worn from catching fish and being pulled out with forceps. So, the extra dollar or two per fly can be worth it from a good tyer.
 
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