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Have never caught one before although i did catch a brook trout that was really bright orange a few years back, i'm guessing it fed heavily on crustaceans? So naturally they're on my "to catch" list (along with lake trout, burbot and atlantic sturgeon)

The angling summary supports that they do exist in NB, but i've never seen or heard of them being caught before. Anyone catching any?
 

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I also have caught some really bright orange brookies but i don't know if they were char or not. I think there are some in walton lake out past adairs but i also haven't heard of anyone catching any they are at the top of my list also!
 

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Good day;

Some years ago I remember seeing a DNR report on arctic char in NB; there were 3 lakes listed as having sustaining populations of arctic char, and Waltons Lake is one of them. The lake is actually just before Adairs Lodge on the right hand side if you are approaching from Sussex. The lake is leased by Larry Adair from the province, so access to it is through him. I believe the daily rate is $75.00 per person per day, although you should check with Larry directly. I know him personally, and he is a very fine man.

There are some pictures of char inside the lodge that were caught in the lake. The fish have a distinct reddish/pinkish hue throughout their entire length, not just on the belly. Also, I would point out that if you have caught a brook trout, then you have caught a char. Brook trout, as well as lake trout, bull trout (found out west) and dolly varden trout (out west and in the far north) are actually not true trout, but members of the char family, just as arctic char are.

Brook trout will indeed take on a very distinct orange hue on the belly portion of the fish; more so the males than females.
This belly coloration becomes much more brilliant as the fish approach spawning season, although I'm not aware myself if diet plays a part in this.
 

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Here's how you tell the difference between an arctic char and a brookie: Regardless of whether they are sea-run or not,

1) Arctic char: on the pectoral fins and anal fins there is a white stripe on the leading edge, but no black stripe next to the white one.
2) Brook Trout: on the pectoral fins and anal fins there is a white stripe on the leading edge, along with a black stripe next to the white one.
 

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The one's had look like a small salmon but down the side in a line there are reddist orange dot and some orange stomach. it all depends on the time of year.
 

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the main differences is no varigated pattern on the back (no squiggly camo pattern), next as Stroover says, the char do not have the black line on the fin, just the white. some brookies also don`t have the black line, or not on all the fins (which i didn`t know untill i recently caught a few with no or almost no black line).

i was thinking there should be some in Big Salmon along with the rainbows and brookies. thanks for confirming Shadetree.
 
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